May is Motorcycle Safety Month

Get Up to Speed on Motorcycles. Motorcyclists and Motorists Can Work Together to Save Lives. Motorcyclists Are at Great Risk on Our Roadways. With thousands of deaths each year, motorcyclists are significantly overrepresented in traffic crashes and fatalities. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), motorcyclists accounted for nearly 14 percent of all traffic fatalities in 2015, while … Read More

Cinco de Mayo Plan

In the rush of party preparations and getting dressed up for a night out, it’s easy to forget the most important Cinco de Mayo plan of all: designating a sober driver. Some fiesta-goers think they can play it by ear and wait until after the party has started to decide whether they’re “okay to drive.” By this point, it’s too … Read More

Cinco de Mayo Fatalities

Data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) shows that drunk-driving crash fatalities are a disturbing Cinco de Mayo trend. From 2012-2016, almost one-third (28%) of all traffic crash fatalities during the Cinco de Mayo holiday period, on average, were drunk-driving related.

Cinco de Mayo 1

In the United States, the Cinco de Mayo holiday is full of fiestas and margaritas! If you’re the one striking up the mariachi band, remember that at the end of the night, you need to have a safe and sober ride home. During the Cinco de Mayo holiday in 2016 (6 p.m. May 4 to 5:59 a.m. May 6), 257 … Read More

Cinco de Mayo! 2018

As cultural celebrations go, Cinco de Mayo and St. Patrick’s Day have a lot in common. Both are celebrated by large immigrant populations. Both traditionally involve copious libations. Which in turn draws the attention of lots of highway patrol and police cruisers.     Cinco de Mayo DUI Arrests: 2016 – 378 people arrested Cinco de Mayo DUI Arrests: 2017 … Read More

In 2016, 266 people died at railroad crossings

Although rail incidents have been on the decline for the past 10 years, railroad- crossing fatalities have spiked in recent years. In 2016 alone, 266 people died at railroad crossings, a 16-percent increase from 2015.