License Plate Recognition and the 1994 Drivers Privacy Protection Act

(LPR) cameras mounted on Police Cars and fixed locations in Arizona take photos of license plates capturing date, time and GPS coordinates of where the photo was taken- just like any smartphone camera.
Each plate image captured, along with the data for that image (date, time, location) is stored in secure database as an LPR record that can be searched only by authorized personnel. One major LPR provider that can offer over 5 billion nationwide detections and over 150 million more added monthly.
Arizona agencies owns the LPR data it generates Arizona can decide whether to share that data with other agencies.

The federal DPPA was enacted in 1994

Congress enacted the federal Drivers’ Privacy Protection Act of 1994 to provide strong privacy protections regarding personally identifiable information held by state DMVs. The DPPA’s purpose, as stated in the bill’s preamble, was “to protect the personal privacy and safety of licensed drivers consistent with the legitimate needs of business and government.” More recently, the U.S. Supreme Court summarized the legislative history and explained that Congress decided to override state laws with the DPPA because of “the States’ common practice of selling personal information to businesses engaged in direct marketing and solicitation.” Maracich v. Spears, 570 U.S. (June 17, 2013)